Historic Bremen

Bremen, Indiana

Page 2 of 10

1894: That’s a lot of boloney

Presented without comment. From the Bremen Enquirer – 12 Oct 1894.

1960: Bornemann Products burns down

William Bornemann came to Bremen to start a shoe-making business in 1893. He had been born in Westphalia, Prussia, in 1870 and emigrated in 1888. He married Elsbeth Saenger, another German immigrant he met by arrangement in South Bend. They… Continue Reading →

1909: Dr Schilt dodges a serious charge of speeding

Born southeast of Bremen on what became the Theodore Graverson farm, Clarence Schilt (1888-1955) went off to Ontario to learn to be a veterinarian. But he returned to his home town to start a practice. It didn’t last long, however,… Continue Reading →

Then & Now: 303 N Center St

Among the photos from the Louis Flora collection donated to Historic Bremen is one of the house at 303 N Center St, a house where (the back of the photo indicates) his great-grandfather James Bates had lived at one time… Continue Reading →

History Chat: Carolyn Rahe on saving barns

Carolyn Rahe is the daughter of Dr George Meyer, a veterinarian who came to Bremen in the early 1960s. Growing up on a farm, she became interested in livestock and barns and has become a passionate advocate for saving local… Continue Reading →

1904: Rabbit turns hunter

Charles Scott, who took over the Bremen Enquirer for a short time at the turn of the previous century, ran this story he picked up from the Wilmington Democrat of Wilmington, Ohio, but with his own humorous editorializing. Click the… Continue Reading →

Edward Geiselman, sculptor

Bremen co-founder Josiah Geiselman, blacksmith, had 10 children, 7 of whom survived to adulthood, with wife Mary (born Ringle). The Geiselman name nevertheless died out in this area after just two generations. But one of Josiah and Mary’s children showed… Continue Reading →

1889: A musical tour of Bremen

Back in the old country, the town of Bremen has long been associated with a certain group of musicians (a donkey, a dog, a cat, and a rooster, to be exact). But our own town has long had a similar… Continue Reading →

1886: A Christmas miracle… of a sort

This ran in the Bremen Enquirer on Christmas Day, 1886…. A plug hat was a hat with a short, round crown. It was an older style. This one is from the civil war.

1897: The People’s Circulating Library

Before the town of Bremen had a proper library (which was established in the town hall in the 1920s before a proper library building was built in the 1950s), it had the People’s Circulating Library, run by the Koontz brothers,… Continue Reading →

Judge Kitch remembers the 1870s

In December of 1938, the Hon. John W Kitch (1866-1946), judge of the Marshall circuit court, gave a talk to the members of the Kiwanis club. As James K Gorrell, who reprinted the talk in the Bremen Enquirer at the… Continue Reading →

1889-1929: Cousins over 40 years

Recently, Paul Hollar came to the Bremen History Center with his wife Beth and mentioned having, as many people do, a box of old family photos. We arranged for Paul and Beth to bring them in so we could have… Continue Reading →

1878: Anti-liquor candidate plies voters with John Barleycorn

This item on an intemperate temperance candidate drowning the poor voters of Bremen ran in the Marshall County Republican prior to the 1878 elections. Adam Vinnedge, who lived west of Bremen and had a store in LaPaz, seems to have… Continue Reading →

1908: Bremen’s Cubs fans thrill to second World Series victory

Note: We ran this last year, but it’s more relevant now…. Baseball was not just the national pastime in the early 20th century but the pastime for most Bremen residents as well. The little town had at least three teams,… Continue Reading →

History Chat: Bob Carrico on St Christopher’s Workshop

In 2010, Bob Carrico gave a History Chat on his family’s business. His parents, Jerry and Ruth Carrico, create a business shortly after World War 2 fabricating light fixtures, altars, baptistries, and many other furnishings for churches all over America…. Continue Reading →

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